Research

Past and on-going projects


Agent-Based Modeling of Co-circulating Viral Strains

Synopsis: concurrently developing compartmental ODE-based and agent-based models for co-circulation of two viral strains and comparison analysis from the model-user standpoint. PI: Thomas Hurd (1956–2022), Michael C. Wolfson (uOttawa), Steve Gribble (StatCan).


Kneading-based Exploration of Lorenz-like Systems

Synopsis: uncovering previously unobserved features within the chaotic regions of the parameter space of the high-dimensional Lorenz systems with connections to atmospheric predictability. In collaboration with Roberto Barrio and Sergio Serrano (U. Zaragoza, Spain).


Atmospheric Predictability and Chaos

Synopsis: Investigating the relationship between atmosphere’s chaotic nature and its predictability with a particular focus on the effects of changing a model’s spatial resolution or numerical precision. Partial funding through NRF Korea Postdoctoral Training Grant (NRF-2021R1A6A3A01086440).

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Chaos and Synchronization in High-Order Lorenz Models

Synopsis: rigorous derivation and analysis of high-dimensional extensions of the Lorenz system with additional physically-relevant features, focusing on bifurcation and chaos synchronization. PhD Project. Partial funding through the Small Grant for Exploratory Research (SGER), National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2018R1D1A1A02086007); PI: Jong-Jin Baik (Seoul National U.).

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Effects of Pandemic-induced Restrictions on Air Quality

Synopsis: analysis of air quality fluctuations during the period under strict social distancing in South Korea based on data collected by air quality monitoring stations. PI: Jong-Jin Baik (Seoul National U.).

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Other Atmospheric Science Collaborations


Mathematical Modeling in Epidemiology

Synopsis: developing a computational epidemiological model in the presence of risk-taking vs. risk-averse populations with and without the learning-based behavioral changes during a hypothetical infectious disease epidemic. Undergraduate honors project. Partial funding through the URECA Center, Wake Forest University. co-PIs: Frederick Chen and Miaohua Jiang (Wake Forest U.).